Steph Curry responds to disappointed 9-year-old fan's letter and everyone can learn a thing or two from it

A little basketball playing girl wrote a letter to majorly successful NBA star Steph Curry, but she didn't exactly sing his praises like many of his fans would.

Not young Riley Morrison. No, this 9-year-old girl wrote to the star athlete to express her disappointment, and we totally see where's she's coming from. 


Do you think sneakers should be labelled separately for boys and girls or just be gender neutral? Let us know by emailing us at chatback@Parent24.com and we could publish your comments. Do let us know if you'd like to remain anonymous.

Her dad shared a picture of her letter on his Instagram account and captioned it "My daughter's letter to Steph Curry. Her way of attempting to make a difference. Proud of her."

In her letter, Riley says that she asked her dad to get her a pair of the new Curry 5's (Steph Curry's shoe), but was disappointed to find that none of these shoes were for sale in the girls' section. 

What made it even more disheartening was that they had the exact shoe for sale in the boys' section and they were even given the option to customise the shoe, yet the girls' section had nothing at all. 

Riley (who happens to be the namesake of Steph Curry's daughter) then went on to sweetly add, "I know you support girl athletes because you have two daughters and you host an all-girls basketball camp", showing how she still maintains faith in the athlete and is not being malicious about the issue. 

She then ended the letter off with her hope that Steph will work on the problem because "girls want to rock the Curry 5's too."

I'm sure she's not the only girl who feels this way.  

I can personally account for the fact that women and girls are often just an afterthought when it comes to sneakers; men usually get all the good ones and it's so difficult to find your size in the pairs you actually want. Why should shoes have a gender anyway? 

Not all little girls want to wear pink shoes with hearts and bows on them and not all little boys want to wear sporty or "tough" shoes, and that's completely okay. In 2018, you'd think brands would be more conscious of this when it comes to children's attire. Enough with the stereotypes and gender inequality!  

Especially when it comes to something like sport. Does the fact that girls aren't given basketball shoes insinuate that girls don't play basketball too? We become so accustomed to only finding certain shoes in the boys' section that it almost becomes the norm, so people like Riley Morrison calling out the foolishness is exactly what we need. Plus, doing so in the most precious and gracious way? We're proud of you too, missy! 

Steph Curry proved himself to be quite a breath of fresh air with his response though, hand-writing a letter and taking to Twitter to address the issue, captioning the tweet "Appreciate you helping us get better Riley! We got you. #MoreToCome." 

In his response to Riley, he stated: "I appreciate your concern and have spent the last 2 days talking to Under Armour about how we can fix the issue. Unfortunately, we have labelled smaller sizes as "Boys" on the website. We are correcting this now! I want to make sure you can wear my kicks proudly –so I am going to send you a pair of Curry 5's..."

It's great to see young children stand up for what they believe in and actually have people take them seriously. It's also a great example for adults of how you learn, grow and move forward.

We must commend Steph on his response and his willingness to make a difference, too (plus, making this little girl feel really special). Here's hoping the appropriate changes are made and that everyone learns something. 

Do you think sneakers should be labelled separately for boys and girls or just be gender neutral? Let us know by emailing us at chatback@Parent24.com and we could publish your comments. Do let us know if you'd like to remain anonymous.

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